Bandelier National Monument

Last post about New Mexico, I promise.

We took a day trip from Santa Fe to Bandelier National Monument where a number of Ancestral Pueblo dwellings have been preserved.

Most of the area is made up of volcanic tuff, a soft material that the Pueblo Indians were able to carve in to.

There are miles and miles of trails throughout the monument, some with steps and footbridges, but for the most part it’s flat.

All of those large holes above are caves and some of them connect to each other. They’re rather small inside, and most not high enough to properly stand up in, so I assume the majority of them were used for sleeping.

They have ladders set up at the mouths of some of the caves so you can climb in to have a look. They’re really easy to get up, but not much fun on the way down…

We didn’t spend much time here, as it was way too hot and there wasn’t much in the way of shade, but I’m sure it would make for a great hike in the cooler months. There were hardly any visitors around the time we went, which added to the beauty of the place, it was unbelievably calm and peaceful.

Not surprisingly, the drive to and from was my favourite part, I will never tire of turning a corner and seeing this:

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On to Santa Fe

We picked up Zippy here and saw a few more things in Albuquerque before heading on to Santa Fe.

Petroglyph National Monument is not too far out of the way and makes a nice stop before getting on the highway.

The monument is actually made up of a series of dormant volcanoes. There are four trails you can take, with one of the shortest have the largest number of view-able petroglyphs. We managed to see quite a lot in the couple of hours before we hit the road.

Although it wasn’t our original plan, renting a car was one of the best decisions we made. So much of what we loved of New Mexico we were only able to see on the drives. Curving, steep mountain roads with gorgeous views and plenty of lookout points so you can stop and take it all in.

We arrived in downtown Santa Fe in the early evening and saw a notice for a walking tour leaving from our hotel, we decided on that to get our bearings and learn a bit about the city.

Santa Fe as it is today was planned mostly in the early 20th century when New Mexico became a state, but its history stretches back hundreds of years to the Spanish and the Pueblo Indians before them. By city ordinance all new buildings must be built in the Pueblo (adobe) style, and for the most part that’s what you’ll see, the main exception being the St. Francis Cathedral.

Downtown Santa Fe isn’t all that large and you can see a lot of it in a couple of days. There is a lot of history so having a guided tour can be helpful. The majority of places are a short distance from the plaza – galleries, art studios, restaurants, market stalls, and shops – so I recommend staying close by if you can.